KOB survey of convicted burglars reveals how, why they strike

house security by dog and cat image

ABQ4WARD SURVEY FOR BURGLARY INMATES AND RELEASED CONVICTS

Many homeowners rely on man’s best friend to sound the alarm against intruders, but survey revealed dogs don’t deter many burglars, but they consider a breed. Pay attention to your doggy door, size of it, how strong it is and do not forget to double lock it and set up a security device into it! Pet Angel Irina provides house security check on every pet care visit.

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1. What was the most common way you entered a home illegally?

  • Unlocked door – 12%
  • Unlocked window – 19%
  • Kicked in door – 23%
  • Broke through window – 16%
  • Through garage door – 7%
  • I had a key – 7%
  • Other – 16%

2. If a house or an apartment had an alarm system, what was your reaction?

  • No problem, I can turn it off – 3%
  • No problem, I won’t set it off – 0%
  • I’ll be gone before police arrive – 31%
  • Leave immediately – 66%

3. If there was a security camera near a door or entry way, would that stop you from breaking in?

  • Yes – 40%
  • No – 43%
  • Maybe – 17%

Respondents said they could change the direction of the camera, break the camera, throw a cloth on the camera, climb on the roof to get around the camera, or cut a wire. Other convicts would cover their face before the break-in. Burglars under the influence of drugs would break-in without taking any camera precautions.

4. Did you target lower income or higher income neighborhoods?

  • Lower income – 0%
  • Higher income – 54%
  • Doesn’t matter – 46%

5. Were you deterred by gated communities?

  • Yes – 43%
  • No – 46%
  • Maybe – 11%

Some respondents feared being cornered once inside the gated community. Some needed to know the way out before entering the gated community.

6. Were you deterred by dogs?

  • Yes – 57%
  • No – 39%
  • Maybe – 4%

Like Rangel, other convicts admitted to drugging a dog to put it to sleep. Barking is a deterrent. Other convicts would consider the breed before approaching the animal.

7. Did you care if the lights were on?

  • Yes – 25%
  • No – 64%
  • Maybe – 11%

Some convicts doubled checked to ensure the owners were gone, some knocked on the door to see if anyone would answer.

8. What room in the home was the most appealing?

  • Bedroom – 62%
  • Living room – 21%
  • Kitchen – 3%
  • Dining room – 8%
  • Other – 6%

A few convicts, including Rangel, said the “kids room” was off limits. Burglars also considered office rooms to have a substantial amount of valuables. A few targeted the garage. 

9. When you broke into a home, did you bring an accomplice?

  • Yes – 54%
  • No – 36%
  • Maybe – 10%

Some brought an accomplice in case something went wrong. A few didn’t trust accomplices.

10. When you broke into a home, was it typically a house of someone you knew?

  • Yes – 21%
  • No – 68%
  • Maybe – 11%

Some did not want to risk being “found out.” Others felt it was easier to target people they had befriended.

11. Did you break into homes in your own neighborhood?

  • Yes  – 28%
  • No – 72%

Many convicts did not want their neighbors to learn that they were a burglar. Some did break into homes in their neighborhood because it was easier to transport stolen goods.

12. Did you prefer to avoid confrontation?

  • Yes – 92%
  • No – 4%
  • Maybe – 4%

Most did not want to risk getting caught. A few convicts would not break-in if children were present. A select few did not fear confrontation.

13. What attracted you to burglarizing a home?

  • Drugs – 42%
  • Bills/Rent- 21%
  • Thrill/ Excitement – 18%
  • Family – 9%
  • Other – 9%

Many convicts admitted that they burglarized people to pay for a drug addiction. Most respondents who said they did it for the “thrill” also said they needed to pay for a drug addiction. Those who said they stole for their families said were not motivated by drugs.

Designed by Igor Skibenko